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diaryofanegress

Observations of an Invisible Woman

Archive for the tag “herbs”

Blacks and Health: A Natural Way to Heal #11

“Why should anyone die who has sage in their garden?”

Sage

That is the old adage I’ve heard for years.

Sage is apart of the mint family (yes!) and has about 900 different species to boast. The botanical name Salvia is from the Latin word  “to save or to heal,” as in the word “salvation.” Africans have associated sage with immortality since they learned the secrets of this plant. Since roughly the 5th century B.C., Africans have used sage for a myriad of holistic and Spiritual reasons. Early medicine doctors knew that this herb could also help prevent “spasms” in the abdomen, heart and uterus and was administered to females in puberty, childbirth and menopause.

Workers and farmers were given sage to chew on while they toiled in the hot sun as it contains a “cooling agent” called phytosterols. I grow sage annually and can’t wait to harvest its leaves for its distinct flavour. Aside from enhancing the flavour of my stews, which I cook year round, sage is magnificent for:

Drying up phlegm (mucus) in your bronchial tubes (respiratory infections)

Coughing (boil the leaves and use as a gargle)

Diarrhea

Excessive perspiration

Menstrual cramps

Weaning your baby off of breast milk (it dries up mother’s milk)

Dandruff (use the leaves for tea and rinse your hair with it)

Eczema

Psoriasis

Restores colour to gray hair

Ringworm

Bacterial infections in and outside of the body

Jellyfish and spider bites

Indigestion and gas/bloating

Anxiety and Depression

The list is endless! I buy my seeds from the nursery and grow a planter-full every single year. While I toil and dig up weeds, I pinch off a few leaves to help me cool down with a tall glass of water. Please rediscover the miracle of God’s Plants. Soon, the pharmacies will close to us and we will not have easy access to synthetic medicines.

Next Article: Tea Tree Oil

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Blacks and Health: A Natural Way to Heal #10

One of my Dill planters

One of my Dill planters

Last year, I grew absurd amounts of dill on my front porch (picture above). I toiled and toiled to the point of callouses to reap the benefits of this delicious herb. Dill, also called dillweed, is apart of a family called umbellifers. Did you know that this pungent and delicious herb is a cousin to the carrot? Parsley, parsnip and fennel are “grandparents” as well.

The common name dill comes from an Old Norse word “dilla” and means to calm or soothe.

Dill originated in Western Africa. A medicinal herb for at least 5,000 years, it was used as an aphrodisiac and in shamanism to ward off evil. Europeans discovered our herb when they raided the tomb of Amenhotep II and found him filled with this aromatic herb. Our ancestors knew of the benefits of this amazing plant and Eurasia soon followed in our footsteps. Caesar was said to eat large quantities of this herb after a large meal to soothe indigestion. Perhaps the most well-known use is this:

Dill pickle

Because of its strong flavor, dill has also been used for centuries to enhance the flavor of vegetables, meats and seafood.

Aside from gas, dill helps / prevents:

Dill relieves:

Insomnia

Asthma

Hiccups ( yes, it really works)

Dysentery

Diarrhea

Painful menstruation

Sores/ Ulcers (when grinded or pounded)

Our ancestors also used dill tea or pulverized dill as an early form of anti-septic for cuts, bruises and surgery. Aside from being delicious in fish and my soups, dill is an excellent way to get calcium.

I eat the whole thing…seeds and all!

Next article: Sage

Blacks and Health: The Natural Way to Heal Part 5

Me: Did you just eat all my parsley?

My brother: Ummm…..maybe. I can’t remember…

Parsley's Health Benefits When Juicing

The healing powers of parsley( I will lump Chinese Parsley, also called Coriander, in this article ) isn’t lost on my family. In fact, my brother eats this delicious herb like children eat candy. Parsley, Jah’s natural blood cleaner, is so potent that a few sprigs contain a whopping 23% of vitamin C and 10 sprigs have an incredible 205% of vitamin K!

I grow ridiculous quantities of this all spring/ summer to cook my stews, meats and fish with. Sold in seeds, which are so easy to grow, they provide us with Vitamins that are good for:

Bad breath

High blood pressure (parsley is a diuretic which means it aids you in urination)

Liver and Kidney function 

Chlorophyll (to clean your blood)

Sinusitis

Whooping Cough

Gas (Flatulence)

Antioxidants to fight cancer

Bones 

Stroke

Heart Disease

Diabetes

For a small price, about 1.99 for an entire packet of 50 seeds, you get a big benefit.

Next article: Cayenne Pepper

Blacks and Health: The Natural Way to Heal Part 1

The Power of Peppermint

Black people, please heed my warning:

Whites are currently devising all methods to kill us off the planet. Food and health are directly correlated. If the food you eat comes from your enemy, logically speaking, it is bad for you. The day of us running to the doctor and the Pharmacy to obtain medicines is going to end sooner than we think. The cost of healthcare is skyrocketing and paper money will no longer have any value.

We need an alternative way to heal from our illnesses.

My favourite herb is peppermint:

As old as time, Jah has given us a cure-all for everything!!!

Nausea

Headaches

Dandruff

Psoriasis

Acne

Bad breath

Insomnia

Anxiety

High Blood Pressure

Cold and Flu symptoms

Sinusitis

Arthritis

Poor circulation

Peppermint can be crushed and grinded for use in soap, shampoo, mouthwash, toothpaste, salve (for rashes) and to open clogged nostrils for Hay Fever sufferers. If you’ve been reading this blog for awhile now, you know I’m mad about this herb. I actually eat it raw right from my garden down to the purple flowers! Spearmint, applemint, orangemint and chocolatemint are great hybrids for teas. All are delicious and good for the soul. In the winter, a simple potted plant near a sunny window will grow wonderfully til spring and the leaves can be dried and canned for long-term uses.

Please learn to grow your own peppermint, which is so simple, and keep plenty on hand.

Next article: Hibiscus Tea

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