diaryofanegress

Observations of an Invisible Woman

Archive for the tag “eating well”

Blacks and Health: A Natural Way to Heal #10

One of my Dill planters

One of my Dill planters

Last year, I grew absurd amounts of dill on my front porch (picture above). I toiled and toiled to the point of callouses to reap the benefits of this delicious herb. Dill, also called dillweed, is apart of a family called umbellifers. Did you know that this pungent and delicious herb is a cousin to the carrot? Parsley, parsnip and fennel are “grandparents” as well.

The common name dill comes from an Old Norse word “dilla” and means to calm or soothe.

Dill originated in Western Africa. A medicinal herb for at least 5,000 years, it was used as an aphrodisiac and in shamanism to ward off evil. Europeans discovered our herb when they raided the tomb of Amenhotep II and found him filled with this aromatic herb. Our ancestors knew of the benefits of this amazing plant and Eurasia soon followed in our footsteps. Caesar was said to eat large quantities of this herb after a large meal to soothe indigestion. Perhaps the most well-known use is this:

Dill pickle

Because of its strong flavor, dill has also been used for centuries to enhance the flavor of vegetables, meats and seafood.

Aside from gas, dill helps / prevents:

Dill relieves:

Insomnia

Asthma

Hiccups ( yes, it really works)

Dysentery

Diarrhea

Painful menstruation

Sores/ Ulcers (when grinded or pounded)

Our ancestors also used dill tea or pulverized dill as an early form of anti-septic for cuts, bruises and surgery. Aside from being delicious in fish and my soups, dill is an excellent way to get calcium.

I eat the whole thing…seeds and all!

Next article: Sage

Blacks and Health: The Natural Way to Heal Part 7

Garlic

Did you know that garlic is actually in the onion family?

Cousins of this smelly bulb are shallots, chives and leeks. Over 7,ooo years old, this African plant/bulb has been used for its wonderful health benefit. Its hydrogen sulfide production is well-known amongst herbalists to help prevent colon, breast and prostate cancers.

Aside from being delicious in culinary cuisine, garlic protects the heart by:

Increasing blood flow to the arteries

Lowering cholesterol levels in the blood

Combating high blood pressure (when made into a tea)

Lowering blood sugar levels

When we were living in NYC, there was a little bakery that sold garlic knots. Drenched in garlic and fresh oregano, I inhaled these to the point of needing 2 showers a day! LOL!

I put garlic in just about everything I cook including fish and my stews. My friend eats garlic raw (followed by a tall drink of water) and urges us to incorporate this heart friendly bulb in all dishes.

Next article: Ginger

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