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diaryofanegress

Observations of an Invisible Woman

Archive for the tag “Columbus”

Yours Truly, Cristobal Colon

Portrait of Christopher Columbus (Cristobal Colon), of unknown origin, 06/15/10. (art: Unknown)

{This is my second post on Cristobal Colon. I dug deeper into this Khazar’s past and found another letter he wrote to His Majesties}

Cristobal Colon, Anglicized as Christopher Columbus, was a Masonic, mass-murdering Khazar. The white AmeriKlan books portray this European exploiter as some sort of saviour to my people when he was in fact the biggest thief, liar, murderer and rapist ever known to man. Over 100 million of my Ancestors were slaughtered during the Great White Heist.

European public school indoctrination lies to us teaches us that this Jew “discovered” a “planet” that was already in existence. Searching for spices, which was an outright lie, was the reason for the expedition. In reality, the Moors had already introduced spices of curry, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, molasses etc, to the Europeans nearly 100 years earlier. Europeans sailed to the West Indies to conquer and exploit the people and steal their gold-filled land. The first place they landed was said to be what is now known as Puerto Rico, where the indigenous Arawaks welcomed them with food, clothing, shelter and gifts.

Colon, shocked to discover that these “savages” had civilizations far greater than his own, wrote to His Majesty:

Hispaniola is a marvel. Its hills and mountains, fine plains and open country, are rich and fertile for planting and for pasturage, and for building towns and villages. The seaports there are incredibly fine, as also the magnificent rivers, most of which bear gold. The trees, fruits and grasses differ widely from those in Juana. There are many spices and vast mines of gold and other metals in this island. They have no iron, nor steel, nor weapons, nor are they fit for them, because although they are well-made men of commanding stature, they appear extraordinarily timid. The only arms they have are sticks of cane, cut when in seed, with a sharpened stick at the end, and they are afraid to use these. Often I have sent two or three men ashore to some town to converse with them, and the natives came out in great numbers, and as soon as they saw our men arrive, fled without a moment’s delay although I protected them from all injury.

At every point where I landed, and succeeded in talking to them, I gave them some of everything I had — cloth and many other things — without receiving anything in return, but they are a hopelessly timid people. It is true that since they have gained more confidence and are losing this fear, they are so un-suspicious and so generous with what they possess, that no one who had not seen it would believe it. They never refuse anything that is asked for. They even offer it themselves, and show so much love that they would give their very hearts. Whether it be anything of great or small value, with any trifle of whatever kind, they are satisfied.

I forbade worthless things being given to them, such as bits of broken bowls, pieces of glass, and old straps, although they were as much pleased to get them as if they were the finest jewels in the world. One sailor was found to have got for a leathern strap, gold of the weight of two and a half castellanos, and others for even more worthless things much more; while for a new blancas they would give all they had, were it two or three castellanos of pure gold or an arroba or two of spun cotton. Even bits of the broken hoops of wine casks they accepted, and gave in return what they had, like fools, and it seemed wrong to me. I forbade it, and gave a thousand good and pretty things that I had to win their love, and to induce them to become Christians, and to love and serve their Highnesses and the whole Castilian nation, and help to get for us things they have in abundance, which are necessary to us. They have no religion, nor idolatry, except that they all believe power and goodness to be in heaven.

They firmly believed that I, with my ships and men, came from heaven, and with this idea I have been received everywhere, since they lost fear of me. They are, however, far from being ignorant. They are most ingenious men, and navigate these seas in a wonderful way, and describe everything well, but they never before saw people wearing clothes, nor vessels like ours. Directly I reached the Indies in the first isle I discovered, I took by force some of the natives, that from them we might gain some information of what there was in these parts; and so it was that we immediately understood each other, either by words or signs. They are still with me and still believe that I come from heaven. They were the first to declare this wherever I went, and the others ran from house to house, and to the towns around, crying out, “Come ! come! and see the man from heaven!” Then all, both men and women, as soon as they were reassured about us, came, both small and great, all bringing something to eat and to drink, which they presented with marvellous kindness.

I have taken possession of all these islands, for their Highnesses, and all may be more extensive than I know, or can say, and I hold them for their Highnesses, who can command them as absolutely as the kingdoms of Castile. In Hispaniola, in the most convenient place, most accessible for the gold mines and all commerce with the mainland on this side or with that of the great Khan, on the other, with which there would be great trade and profit, I have taken possession of a large town, which I have named the City of Navidad. I began fortifications there which should be completed by this time, and I have left in it men enough to hold it, with arms, artillery, and provisions for more than a year; and a boat with a master seaman skilled in the arts necessary to make others; I am so friendly with the king of that country that he was proud to call me his brother and hold me as such.

Even should he change his mind and wish to quarrel with my men, neither he nor his subjects know what arms are, nor wear clothes, as I have said. They are the most timid people in the world, so that only the men remaining there could destroy the whole region, and run no risk if they know how to behave themselves properly. In all these islands the men seem to be satisfied with one wife except they allow as many as twenty to their chief or men. The women appear to me to work harder than the men, and so far as I can hear, they have nothing of their own, for I think I perceived that what one had others shared, especially food. In the islands so far, I have found no monsters, as some expected, but, on the contrary, they are people of very handsome appearance. They are not black as in Guinea, though their hair is straight and coarse, as it does not grow where the sun’s rays are too ardent. And in truth the sun has extreme power here, since it is within twenty-six degrees of the equinoctial line. In these islands there are mountains where the cold this winter was very severe, but the people endure it from habit, and with the aid of the meat they eat with very hot spices.

Another island, I am told, is larger than Hispaniola, where the natives have no hair, and where there is countless gold; and from them all I bring Indians to testify to this. To speak, in conclusion, only of what has been done during this hurried voyage, their Highnesses will see that I can give them as much gold as they desire, if they will give me a little assistance, spices, cotton, as much as their Highnesses may command to be shipped, and mastic as much as their Highnesses choose to send for, which until now has only been found in Greece, in the isle of Chios, and the Signoria can get its own price for it; as much lign-aloe as they command to be shipped, and as many slaves as they choose to send for, all heathens. I think I have found rhubarb and cinnamon.

Many other things of value will be discovered by the men I left behind me, as I stayed nowhere when the wind allowed me to pursue my voyage, except in the City of Navidad, which I left fortified and safe. Indeed, I might have accomplished much more, had the crews served me as they ought to have done. The eternal and almighty God, our Lord, it is Who gives to all who walk in His way, victory over things apparently impossible, and in this case signally so, because although these lands had been imagined and talked of before they were seen, most men listened incredulously to what was thought to be but an idle tale. But our Redeemer has given victory to our most illustrious King and Queen, and to their kingdoms rendered famous by this glorious event, at which all Christendom should rejoice, celebrating it with great festivities and solemn Thanksgivings to the Holy Trinity, with fervent prayers for the high distinction that will accrue to them from turning so many peoples to our holy faith; and also from the temporal benefits that not only Spain but all Christian nations will obtain. Thus I record what has happened in a brief note written on board the Caravel, off the Canary Isles, on the 15th of February, 1493.

Portrait of Christopher Columbus looking proud and serious

Colon, a Spanish Masonic Jew, with the trademark “M” positioned fingers like this guy:

My Aboriginal Ancestors…hung like cattle waiting to be burned after they introduced Colon to the mountains filled with gold, silver, platinum, copper and turquoise.  Please take notice of my fore-mother as a child, being held upside-down by her tiny feet as she awaited being smashed, head-first, into a tree.

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Jamaican Arawak History

Indigenous Jamaican

 

One of the four large islands of the Caribbean, Xaymaca a.k.a Jamaica, is roughly the size of Connecticut. The island is well known for its rich-tasting Blue Mountain coffee and its bauxite mining and aluminum processing industries.

As early as 600 A.D., Jamaica was settled by Arawaks, indigenous Natives, who called the island Xaymaca. In 1494 Columbus stole the island for Spain and in 1509, Juan de Esquivel began transporting Jamaican Arawaks to Hispaniola, a.k.a Haiti and the Dominican Republic, as slaves.

From Columbus’ Journal:

Saturday, 13 October 1492:

They brought us sticks of the cotton thread and parrots and other little things which it would be tedious to list, and exchanged everything for whatever we offered them. I kept my eyes open and tried to find out if there was any gold, and I saw that some of them had a little piece hanging from a hole in their nose. I gathered from their signs that if one goes south, or around the south side of the island, there is a king with great jars full of it, enormous amounts. I tried to persuade them to go there, But I saw that the idea was not to their liking… 

Sunday, 14 October 1492:

 …These people have little knowledge of fighting, as Your Majesties will see from the seven I have had captured to take away with us so as to teach them our language and return them, unless Your Majesties’ orders are that they all be taken to Spain or held captive on the island itself, for with fifty men one could keep the whole population in subjection and make them do whatever one wanted.

[They are] Used to heat of the rain forest, Arawak families lived without clothes. Arawak men had never done gardening or work around home. They only hunted fish, and let the women do the rest. Even women expecting babies, or with little ones in their care, worked in cassava patches while men sat in hammocks under the shade. When asked if they wanted to get married did not seem in a hurry. The Indians kept themselves cleaner than the Europeans. Believing that sweat weakens the body, they bathed frequently throughout the day.

In their houses—thatched shelters without walls—they sat on clean sand, and they treated one another very politely. Young people called their parents and others of that age “honoured ones.” Older people called all young men “handsome ones” and it took them a while to learn the European titles for women, girls and children, and how to use them. Even though the Arawaks did not have an exact word for humility, they well knew the attitude. One should not look another person in the face while speaking “like a dog,” they believed. Rather, one should rise so that others might sit and count it a privilege to give. Arawak hospitality always involved eating and drinking together and even drank of fermented cassava, held frequent love feasts, and fought at their festivals. — A Pilgrim, Heinrich Beutel

The villagers showed great interest in teaching and no sooner had they learned how to read, then they began to hold classes for the rest and also began helping the pilgrims translate scriptures. The Arawaks, however, had no concept of right and wrong in the European sense, and only dimly comprehended concepts such as worship and faith, but they knew what disobedience meant. They lived according to rigid ethics of their own, something the Europeans realized they could learn from.

Arawaks knew that Yuca (cassava) was a staple food and grew it with minimal care in the tropical climate. They also grew corn, unusual for Caribbean islanders. The women did all the agricultural and craft work at home, whereas the men were generally the warriors. These indigenous peoples invented the hammock (the name derives from the Taíno term hamaca) which the Spaniards used to improve the sanitary conditions of their ships while sleeping.

In repayment for their kindness, the early settlers committed genocide against the Arawaks by ways of small pox, slavery, lynchings, rapes and syphilis.

Today, many islanders such as Puerto Ricans, Surinamese, Venezuela, Guyana and Colombians can claim Arawak ancestry.

This post is dedicated to my brother, a descendant of the noble and peaceful Arawak tribe.

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