diaryofanegress

Observations of an Invisible Woman

Archive for the tag “africans”

My 300th Post

I realized that this post will be my 300th post! I started out my posts trying to innerstand this mad world and ended up creating something I never dreamed of: A cyber African family. I’m so grateful for all of you that have found my energy and permeated me with your insightfulness, your thoughts, your opinions, your stories, your help and your support. In the beginning I felt as if I was drowning. I was in a tumultuous spot in my life and needed an outlet. I went back to my first love, writing, and found refuge.

The funny thing about life is looking back and seeing where you came from, what sparked your change and what road you decided to travel. I was lucky. I had my awakening in a Chinese take-out restaurant and from there I couldn’t look back even if I tried. I began to notice things that I never knew were there before. Like how ALL black neighbourhoods:

Have a check cashing place

A fast food/ fried chicken joint

A liquor/ cigarette shop

A dirty laundromat

A hair care/wig shop owned by people who look nothing like us

No fresh greens/ organic food shops

A pawn shop

And a medical clinic that you would not bring your gerbil to

Jah gave me the ability to “see” past the lies, temptations and the fogginess at this precise moment because it was simply my time. I finally overstand that now. I’m grateful for the pain, the sorrow, the tears, the sleepless nights, the feelings of hopelessness because it prompted me to try and do better. Without my journey of near madness, I would have never been able to know who my enemy is, why he is here, why I am here and what needs to be done.

May I admit a secret?

A month ago, I was getting ready to go out. I glanced in the mirror and The Spirit told me to stop cutting my hair. The glance became a hard stare and I saw myself as a Ras; my head and shoulders covered with long, thick insane-looking hair cascading past my back. I almost didn’t recognize myself but it was indeed me. I saw my own vision of what I will become. I no longer question anything The Great Spirit tells me so I immediately gathered my shearers and put them in my cubby.

I’m awaiting more “instructions” from Her. As I grow, I feel more fulfilled. Funny thing is, the more I awaken from my sleep, the more I disconnect from this reality. The more I disconnect from this reality, the more I can spot the lies and half-truths and figure out why I am being mislead and how to counter it.

I hope that this journey has been/ will be fulfilling for all of you. Tell me, what have you learned from your journey into awakening? What areas do you feel you need to work on?

Blacks and Health: A Natural Way to Heal #10

One of my Dill planters

One of my Dill planters

Last year, I grew absurd amounts of dill on my front porch (picture above). I toiled and toiled to the point of callouses to reap the benefits of this delicious herb. Dill, also called dillweed, is apart of a family called umbellifers. Did you know that this pungent and delicious herb is a cousin to the carrot? Parsley, parsnip and fennel are “grandparents” as well.

The common name dill comes from an Old Norse word “dilla” and means to calm or soothe.

Dill originated in Western Africa. A medicinal herb for at least 5,000 years, it was used as an aphrodisiac and in shamanism to ward off evil. Europeans discovered our herb when they raided the tomb of Amenhotep II and found him filled with this aromatic herb. Our ancestors knew of the benefits of this amazing plant and Eurasia soon followed in our footsteps. Caesar was said to eat large quantities of this herb after a large meal to soothe indigestion. Perhaps the most well-known use is this:

Dill pickle

Because of its strong flavor, dill has also been used for centuries to enhance the flavor of vegetables, meats and seafood.

Aside from gas, dill helps / prevents:

Dill relieves:

Insomnia

Asthma

Hiccups ( yes, it really works)

Dysentery

Diarrhea

Painful menstruation

Sores/ Ulcers (when grinded or pounded)

Our ancestors also used dill tea or pulverized dill as an early form of anti-septic for cuts, bruises and surgery. Aside from being delicious in fish and my soups, dill is an excellent way to get calcium.

I eat the whole thing…seeds and all!

Next article: Sage

Wilson’s Post

Negress: “do you like being black? You are from Africa, right?”

Wilson: I have no problem being black and yes I am from Africa.

Thanks for the food for thought. A lot to think about, I can’t say I have any answers to these problems I personally face.

I think you should do a post on the main divisions of blackness because let us face the truth, unless you are blind we aren’t all the same. Things that I have heard being said over and over and yet no one really ever talks about it on the blogosphere:

Black americans look down on black africans.
Black islanders – carribbean, look down on black africans.
There is huge divisions between how all these see each other.

The word here is superiority where in the hierarchy of all this, we have black americans thinking they are the most superior, followed by islanders, then the usual africans at the bottom. This is the truth out there. There is a huge carribean population in Britain and most Africans I know say the same stuff, family and african friends in america say black americans try and distance themselves from black africans etc, that they look down upon us.

You can search this stuff up online and see some people are talking about it:

http://www.everytingjamaican.com/jamaicatalk/jamaica-news/38066-why-jamaicans-racist-towards-black-people-african-culture-2.html

http://www.topix.com/forum/afam/TL2O0IMGMO8M2JV5Q

Personally, I might be black but I ain’t blind enough to think we are all in the same boat because some of us think they are better and can define what being black is to the extent that they deny it on others who are clearly black as well.

You come to africa and people see you are an islander or black american, they’ll treat you with extra hospitality, go to the islands or america and they see you are black african, they treat you with a dash of resentment. What is going on here?? The thing here is that there is enough black africans saying this that it isn’t just something made up but might actually hint at something greater hiding in the shadows.

Anyways, I think this would make an interesting discussion.

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For those of you that are not up to speed, Wilson wrote an interesting comment on Open Discussion #4 regarding My “Countering White Supremacy Post.” Please read the exchanges between us to get a better understand of what’s happening here.

Wilson, since this post is about you, may I relay some advise from a very wise man:

If you do not understand White Supremacy (Racism)-what it is, and how it works-everything else that you understand will only confuse you. Neely Fuller Jr.

The tension between Blacks throughout the diaspora is caused by white people. 

Any thoughts to help Wilson understand that black people are not at the crux of his issues?

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